The German society for oral and maxillo – facial surgery (DGMKG) warns of improper dealing with the lost tooth Hofheim, January 2011. In ice hockey, it is not uncommon, and also with other everyday sports such as skiing or cycling, it happens: an encumbrance, a fall and one or more teeth are lost. Beaten out teeth can be successfully used in many cases by sports injuries or even in the wake of increasing violence again, to act immediately and properly. The German society for oral and maxillo – facial surgery (DGMKG) warns of improper dealing with the lost tooth and give you advice on the correct procedure, not thoughtlessly put the now very good chance of a successful Replantation on the game. Mouth jaw facial Surgeons (oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons) see it in their everyday: injuries of permanent teeth always come especially in children and adolescents, and lately also in adults due to altered recreational behavior more frequently before.

Teeth lost due to sports injuries or violence affect the front of the upper jaw, in most cases what has particularly aesthetic consequences as well as functional. Thus, maintaining tooth or a (cuttings) of the lost tooth Replantation should have absolute priority. Whether the replantierte tooth back heals, is particularly dependent on the duration and the type of storage until the cuttings”, says Prof. Dr. Dr.

Elmar Esser, press officer of the DGMKG. Essential in the cementoblasts (connective tissue cells, which form the cementum) role on the root surface: they must be protected and receive vital. The vitality of the root skin lost in dry stored for 30 minutes or more humid storage in inappropriate substances. These teeth are later rejected for a Replantation. Tooth out: first aid measures would be the immediate cuttings of the tooth, which affected parties or present in the majority of cases are overwhelmed. The storage of the tooth in the Oral cavity is considered obsolete, since on the one hand is the risk of swallowing or suffocation, as well as the contamination of the tooth with oral cavity germs.